Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg. Second house from the right (no. 107). Mengelberg lived here from 1900. At the upper level was a connection with house no. 105 (to the left).

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg. Study.

The house was increasingly filled with antiques such as clocks, Delft pottery, carpets, paintings, prints, Swiss art, eglomisees, silver, music instruments and glassware. Mengelberg liked to show his art collections to his guests, and he then spoke animatedly and broadly about his 'treasures'. He had hundreds of glass paintings in a separate room that he told us about in detail.

Year 1909. This picture was made on 07-10-1909 by N.H. Wolf (Chief editor of 'De Kunst' magazine) in House Willem Mengelberg. Published 09-10-1909 in 'De Kunst' magazine. Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) visited the Netherlands at the invitation of Willem Mengelberg (1871-1951) to conduct the Dutch premiere of his Symphony No. 7 with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra (RCO) in Amsterdam and in The Hague. His daughter Anna Justine Mahler (Gucki) (1904-1988), who was only seven years when Mahler died, recalled some 60 years later that this photograph was "Mahler as I knew him when I was a child: relaxed, delicate, good-humored, infinitely intelligent and understanding".

Year 1909. Amsterdam. Registration Gustav Mahler (1860-1911) in guest book Willem Mengelberg (1871-1951). Mahler underlines his note to the Mengelbergs with a musical quotation from Movement 4: Lied: Das himmlische Leben (Sehr behaglich). 10-1909.

1920. Amsterdam. Willem Mengelberg (1871-1951) in House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. House Willem Mengelberg.

Amsterdam. Route from the Royal Concertgebouw (A) to House Willem Mengelberg (B) where Gustav Mahler stayed.